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Cinnabon Has Churros In Its Drinks – 2020 Review

Fusion cuisine has brought us so many unexpected yet delightful marriages of food from two distinct culinary cultures. And here comes Cinnabon with its Churro Chillatta that makes us want to say, “Keep it coming!” There’s something so utterly satisfying about indulging in a sugary drink topped with an equally sugary pastry.

The New Churro Chillatta

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First off, we have to say that churros and chocolate dips are food we have difficulty saying no to. Most times we’re faced with the choice of resisting and succumbing to temptation, we just succumb to it. After all, life’s too short to deprive ourselves of the pleasures of life, calories be damned.

When churros are served with something new – aside from its chocolate dip – the willpower to resist become weaker! This was tested when we came across Cinnabon’s Churro Chillatta, a Chillatta with cinnamon swirls and topped with rich, creamy whipped cream, sticky caramel drizzle and – you guessed it right – an actual piece of churro.

Did we mention that it costs $6.29 but we didn’t think about it? When you’re faced with the oh-so-tempting concoction, you will be more than willing to shell out whatever money it costs to get a piece of heaven.

But Cinnabon has more in store. You can order the Churro Chillatta in two versions, namely: first, the one with a classic churro stick stuck in the drink like a flag proudly declaring its territory; and second, the Churro Swirl with a donut-shaped churro. Both are delicious so your choice between the two will boil down to your personal preference.

There’s just one problem with the Churro Chillatta: It’s a limited time only offering. You should head to the nearest Cinnabon outlet and get yours now.

The Classic Churros

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Cinnabon isn’t the inventor of churros, of course, and it’s best to know where it came from lest you think otherwise. But here’s the thing about churros: It’s a complicated origin story.

There’s a debate about where and when churros were invented. Some historians say that youtiao, a Chinese pastry, was the ascendant of the Spanish churro. Youtiao looks like two long breadsticks that were joined and later deep fried in oil, although it was neither dunked in chocolate nor dressed in sugar.

Portuguese explorers brought the Chinese pastry to Iberia and tweaked its recipe. The distinctive star-edged shape and its sweet coating of cinnamon and sugar, as well as its dunking in liquid chocolate, were Portuguese innovations.

On the other hand, some historians assert that churros are an original Spanish creation. Spanish shepherds created a dough with flour, water and salt, the base ingredients of churros, as a bread substitute; the Churra sheep’s ridged horns inspired its star-shaped edge. They then deep fried the dough and added sweets.

The Bottom Line

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The origins of churros may be fuzzy but it has definitely become a favorite in the United States!

However, the introduction of chocolate is clearer, history-wise. In the 1500s, Spaniards introduced churros to South America; this was the time of the Spanish Inquisition. During this time, the Spanish also brought cacao to Europe and processed these seeds to make chocolate; they also sweetened it with sugar and made it into a thick, hot liquid chocolate dip, the perfect accompaniment to churros.

Today, churros and chocolates are a revered tradition in Spain and in other Spanish-speaking countries. You can even find churro joints in Spain that serve the good stuff 24/7. Sometimes, you can’t have too much of a good thing and you can justify your churro indulgence by saying that it comes with chocolates. The dark stuff is known to be rich in antioxidants.

If you were to visit Latin America, you will find plenty of stalls and restaurants selling churros. You will find that while they all seem to look the same, every stall and restaurant has its own version of the beloved snacks. Your choice will boil down to your own preferences; we like our churros warm, if not hot, and with a crispy exterior and a chewy skin.

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Most of us in the United States know churros and a chocolate dip as the quintessential churros snack. But in other countries, the fillings are so varied that there’s no risk of boredom with the choices. In Cuba, for example, churros are filled with guava jam while in Peru, sweet caramel takes the cake.

You can obviously make your own churros at home, especially as its basic ingredients are pantry staples – flour, water, milk, eggs and butter. But it takes a certain skill to get them right so you may want to head to Cinnabon for instant churro pleasure.

Besides, you don’t want to be a victim of the exploding churros, a recipe published in a Chilean newspaper that resulted in exploding churros, literally.  The Chilean Supreme Court ruled that the oil temperature was too hot, thus, the explosions that resulted in serious injuries.

About Henrietta Milanovska

Henrietta Milanovska

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